Welend http://welend.com.au Mon, 19 Aug 2019 04:00:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.13 Want to help your kids buy property? Here’s how. http://welend.com.au/want-to-help-your-kids-buy-property-heres-how/ http://welend.com.au/want-to-help-your-kids-buy-property-heres-how/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:15:32 +0000 http://welend.com.au/?p=450 Continue reading "Want to help your kids buy property? Here’s how."

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The real estate market can be tough for young adults, but as a parent you may be able to lend a helping hand. We tell you how.

1.Parent-to-child loan

A parent-to-child loan is when a parent lends their child money. This is a formal, legally binding arrangement, administered by an independent third party. At the start of the loan period, both parties agree to terms including repayment amounts, a schedule and a process to manage defaults.

  • Benefits: You can set generous terms for your child, but your assets, savings and credit rating are somewhat protected as you are not the borrower.
  • Drawbacks: There are legal implications for your child if they have a spouse and the relationship breaks down, in that the spouse could try to claim some of the loan proceeds as an asset of the relationship to which they are entitled. There are also tax considerations for both parties.

2.Family guarantee

If your child doesn’t have enough security for a mortgage, you could provide a family guarantee. This is where you use some of the equity in your own home as part of the security. For example, your equity might cover 20% of the security, and your child’s new property would be the other 80%. It’s also known as a guarantor loan.

This can be a temporary arrangement until your child has paid down the loan to an acceptable level.

  • Benefits: You have the option of guaranteeing only a portion of the loan.
  • Drawbacks: If your child defaults, your assets are at risk.

3.Becoming a co-applicant

You can help your child secure a loan if you sign on as a co-applicant. This means you’re equally as responsible as your child for meeting repayments. The lender will consider your assets in its borrower’s assessment.

  • Benefits: Your child can obtain a loan with a low income.
    • Drawbacks: If your child stops making repayments, you’re responsible for making them. If you can’t make the repayments, it will affect your credit rating.

    4.Gift

    When you give your child money but don’t expect it to be repaid, it’s considered a gift. You may need to sign a statement to say it’s a gift, not a loan.

    • Benefits: You can provide financial help, possibly without the legal, tax or financial implications of a formal arrangement.
    • Drawbacks: If your child has a spouse and their relationship breaks down, the former partner could make a claim for the property.

    5.Assistance in kind

    If you’re risk averse, consider providing assistance in kind; that is, covering some of the expenses that come along with buying a property. You could pay for services such as a property survey or conveyancing fees, or help with stamp duty.

    • Benefits: You can give practical financial assistance.
    • Drawbacks: The amount of money you provide may be more than what your child ends up spending. For example, you might want to contribute $20,000 but the services cost $15,000. In this case, the rest of the amount is subject to the terms of a gift or loan.

    Make sure you’re well informed about your options when giving or lending money so you can remain in the best position to help your child become a home owner. Please contactWeLendto discuss the right financial arrangement for your family.

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Smart tips for paying off your home loan sooner http://welend.com.au/smart-tips-for-paying-off-your-home-loan-sooner/ http://welend.com.au/smart-tips-for-paying-off-your-home-loan-sooner/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:14:32 +0000 http://welend.com.au/?p=448 Continue reading "Smart tips for paying off your home loan sooner"

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Wondering how to pay off your home loan sooner? We look at some things you could do.

Home loan interest rates remain at historic lows, and the opportunities for paying off a mortgage early are better than ever. Used in conjunction with low rates, here are some extra steps that can speed up loan repayments and reduce your loan balance.

Make higher repayments

One of the easiest ways to quickly reduce the balance of your mortgage is to make larger loan repayments. The minimum repayments required on a loan are calculated on the amount owing and the prevailing home loan interest rate. Repaying more than the minimum can cut the overall term of the loan and save you thousands of dollars in interest. A mortgage repayments calculator will quickly show what savings can be achieved.

Some lenders may charge you an early payment cost for paying your loan in advance. This is particularly the case with fixed-interest loans, so it’s always best to check up-front. These costs can be large.

Make more frequent repayments

Home loans are often structured so that you make monthly repayments. But making fortnightly repayments instead can reduce the term of a loan and save interest. By making fortnightly repayments, you are paying the equivalent of half of your monthly repayment every two weeks. This allows you to make the equivalent of one extra monthly repayment per year. Extra repayments will ensure the loan balance is lower at the time of the month the interest is calculated.

Use an interest offset account

Most lenders allow you to package a mortgage with an interest offset account. An offset account allows you to reduce the amount of interest paid on your loan by offsetting the amount in the (offset) account against your loan balance. Wages and other income can be deposited into your offset account. Note that you don’t earn interest on the funds in the offset account, and that offset is usually only available on variable rate loans.

Seek out lower rates

Although obvious, many borrowers take out a mortgage and then stop following the home loan market. With interest rates constantly changing, it pays to monitor the latest rates. If rates change, contact your lender or WeLend and ask if they can review the rate on your loan.

Don’t take the rate cut

When a lender reduces the interest rate on its home loans, usually in line with a cut in official interest rates, your first thought may be to reduce your loan repayments accordingly. However, by maintaining your loan repayments, you effectively repay more than the minimum loan repayment. If it’s possible to do so, this will help you cut the term of the loan and save on interest.

 Pay both principal and interest

While you can make lower repayments by choosing an interest-only loan, doing so means the principal component of the loan will not be repaid while you are only paying interest.

Pay fees upfront

When initially taking out a mortgage, lenders will often roll the establishment costs and charges into the loan. While this may help the short-term budget, it’s worth paying these costs separately to lower the overall balance of the loan from the start.

Use your home equity

As home prices rise, you build more equity in your property. Redrawing funds from a home loan to pay for renovations and other costs can be a much cheaper source of funds than others.

Set up a split loan

A split loan, sometimes referred to as a combination loan, enables borrowers to divide their mortgage into both variable and fixed components. By doing this, you can not only make extra payments on the variable component, but also lock in a lower fixed rate. Extra payments can often be made on the fixed loan too, up to a limit specified by the lender.

Get a financial package

You can often lock in a discounted loan rate with a financial package and also find special rates on other products and services. Putting those savings into your mortgage is a great way to get the best of both worlds.

With just a few easy steps, borrowers can significantly reduce the length of their mortgage and save thousands of dollars in the process. WeLend can assist you in setting everything up.

For more information on how you can pay off your home loan sooner, contact WeLend to discuss your options.

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Real estate market wrap-up http://welend.com.au/real-estate-market-wrap-up/ http://welend.com.au/real-estate-market-wrap-up/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:13:03 +0000 http://welend.com.au/?p=446 Continue reading "Real estate market wrap-up"

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How have property prices fared over the last 12 months? Which way is the market headed? Here, we take a quick look at the current state of the market.

A year of growth
2016 saw capital city property prices grow at their fastest rate since 2009.

In the 12 months to May 2017, property prices lifted in all capital cities, except Perth and Darwin which experienced dips of 3.82% and 6.43%¹ respectively.

Melbourne and Sydney lead the growth cities with average increases of 11.52% and 11.07%¹. Prices in Canberra and Hobart also experienced significant growth, sitting at 5.65% and 5.80% while in Brisbane and Adelaide growth was in the 2–3% range¹.

Trends for the year ahead
Many experts agree that property prices in Australia are likely to continue rising during 2017 before losing momentum with some segments starting to slide backwards.

While past results are not a reliable prediction of future performance, the results for the month ending 31 May 2017 indicate a possible cooling of the market, especially the residential unit market.

In all capital cities, except Perth and Brisbane, unit prices dropped during May.

In Sydney, the drop was 2.70%. With a drop of 1.04% in house prices, Sydney experienced an overall negative change of 1.32% for all dwellings during May¹.

Melbourne experienced a larger percentage drop, with units prices dropping 3.79% and houses dropping 1.47%. Melbourne experienced an overall negative change of 1.68% for all dwellings¹.

In May, the biggest slowdown was observed in Hobart, with month-on-month residential house and unit prices dropping by an overall 4.84%¹.

NAB expects the market to cool noticeably in 2017, but notes prices could be more resilient than some commentators have suggested, with fewer properties entering the market and underlying demand remaining solid in many areas. However, authorities have announced prudential measures that are seeing credit conditions tighten, which combined with a record pipeline of residential construction in some cities, is adding to the uncertainty facing the housing market outlook. NAB expects the market will continue to soften into 2018.

Federal Budget 2017-18
The recent Federal Budget contains a few proposals that may factor into the direction of property prices as we move further into 2017. Foreign investors might put less pressure on the market if an annual foreign investment levy goes ahead, which will kick in when foreign investors leave their property vacant for more than six months. It’s also proposed that a capital gains tax should apply to foreign

property owners who sell their main residence. An incentive for older Australians to downsize, along with a super savings scheme for first home buyers, may also affect property availability.

Sources
¹
https://www.corelogic.com.au/research/monthly-indices.html

http://www.smh.com.au/business/property/home-prices-will-rise-dont-expect-a-crash-economists-20170201-gu35ta.html

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Mortgage offset accounts: Making your loan work for you http://welend.com.au/mortgage-offset-accounts-making-your-loan-work-for-you/ http://welend.com.au/mortgage-offset-accounts-making-your-loan-work-for-you/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:11:30 +0000 http://welend.com.au/?p=444 Continue reading "Mortgage offset accounts: Making your loan work for you"

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Savvy borrowers have an endgame in sight before they even apply for a home loan, and with the right mortgage offset account, they could win that game even more quickly.

Home buyers usually focus on the here and now, not the distant future. Rather than the size of their loan balance in 10 or 20 years, they are more likely to think about how much they can borrow and the kind of house they can afford.

But smart borrowers know the future matters. The years roll around and it’s always better to pay off a mortgage before its term and pay less interest to the bank.

The good news is that if a mortgage offset account is right for a borrower, it can help them do just that. An offset account can make them a match for their mortgage.

What is a mortgage offset account?

A mortgage account with 100 per cent offset is a fully featured transaction account that sits alongside a home loan. In many ways it acts just like a regular bank account.

However, along with the usual facilities, like ATM access and direct debit, there’s another significant advantage: Any money sitting in the offset account reduces the amount that the bank calculates interest payments against.

That’s right. The loan principal is reduced for the purposes of interest calculation by the amount of money in the offset account, without increasing the repayment amount.

How does an offset account work?

An example may make it easier to understand how an offset account works. If a home buyer has a principal of $350,000 outstanding on their mortgage and also has $10,000 in a linked 100 per cent offset account, the bank will only charge them interest on $340,000.

The money they save in interest goes straight into paying down their loan principal, which has the effect of reducing the interest paid over the life of the loan, as well as the overall loan term. Less money paid off faster.

When borrowers realise that banks calculate interest on mortgages daily, offset accounts can be used proactively. For example, getting salary paid into an offset account means the loan principal is in effect reduced by that amount as soon as it is paid.

Savvy borrowers may even choose to use interest-free days on their credit cards to pay for goods and services, so they can keep cash in their offset accounts working for them.

How can WeLend help?

WeLend help borrowers apply for and secure appropriate home loans every day, and many will have an accompanying offset account. We compare a range of competitive products, and look at loan features like offset accounts so borrowers can make informed decisions.

Anyone with a mortgage can choose to have a linked offset account, although it will depend on the loan type and institution. It’s always best to check the offset is 100 per cent.

It’s important to know that offset accounts are usually included as part of fully featured home loans, which might mean you pay more in fees or a higher interest rate. So discussing your financial circumstances with WeLend could be a smart first step.

Game, offset, match

Borrowers who are serious about winning the mortgage game need to be aware that having a mortgage offset account could offer them an edge in the long term.

In any sport, a match isn’t won instantly. Points are accumulated over time. With the points scored daily by an offset account, it can be game, offset and match.

For more information contact WeLend today.

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Home loans 101 http://welend.com.au/home-loans-101/ http://welend.com.au/home-loans-101/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:10:24 +0000 http://welend.com.au/?p=442 Continue reading "Home loans 101"

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There are a range of home loans available, so it can be hard to understand their features and whether they are right for you. This guide explains all you need to know.

Variable loans

Variable loans are loans that are subject to interest rate fluctuations. Whenever your bank increases or decreases interest rates, you will end up either paying more or less for your loan, depending on what the bank has decided to do.

A typical owner-occupied mortgage is taken out over 25 or 30 years, although you can reduce the overall term by making higher or more frequent payments. Mortgages are either based on principal (the amount you borrowed from the bank) and interest (the amount you pay back for having borrowed that money) loan repayments, or interest-only repayments (generally available for 1-5 years for owner occupied loans and 1-10 years for investment loans) where none of the principal component of the loan is paid down.

 Fixed-rate loans          

Fixed loans allow you to lock in a specific interest rate over a set period of time, generally between one and five years. This loan is popular among borrowers who want to ensure their repayments don’t rise. The main risk is that if variable rates fall, you are locked in at a higher rate. The cost of breaking a fixed rate loan contract can be substantial, and there can be financial penalties for making additional payments.

 Split-rate loans

You can take out a mortgage with one portion of the loan variable, and the other fixed. In many ways, this offers the best of both worlds and you have the flexibility to repay more on the variable loan and reduce risk through the fixed loan.

Low-doc loans

Mortgage lenders require you to provide evidence of your ability to meet loan repayments, but this can be a problem for non-salaried workers such as the self-employed. Low-doc loans require less proof-of-income paperwork, but the interest rate levied is often higher than the standard variable rate.

 Professional or packaged loans

Some lenders offer mortgages that provide ‘lifetime’ discounted interest rates, fee waivers and linked savings accounts and credit cards. These options are generally offered on high loan amounts.

Non-genuine savings loans

Lenders prefer borrowers to show they have the ability to save funds over time to cover their repayments. If a deposit is accrued quickly due to an inheritance or from other sources, lenders may provide less funding and require lenders mortgage insurance. Lenders mortgage insurance is a one-off insurance payment that covers the bank in case you can’t make your repayments. It is usually required for home loans with a loan-to-value ratio (LVR) over 80%.

Construction loans

These loans allow amounts of finance to be drawn down progressively to cover the various stages of a construction project. Repayments (generally only on interest for the first 12 months, then principal and interest thereafter) are only made on the amount of the loan facility that has been drawn down. However, there are line fees on the undrawn amount, or in most cases on the total facility limit.

Line-of-credit facilities

This is a way of tapping into equity in an existing home and drawing down funds as required for different purposes, such as renovations. Similar to a credit card, repayments are only made on the amount drawn down. Line-of-credit loans are often interest-only for a significant period, but can revert to principal and interest repayments down the track. Most lenders charge extra for line of credit accounts, either through a facility fee, undrawn funds fees and/or a higher interest rate.

Bridging loans

Bridging loans are designed as short-term financing options for borrowers who need funding to buy a new residence before selling their existing home. The interest rates on these loans are higher than the standard variable interest rate.

SMSF loans

The rules around borrowing funds within a self-managed superannuation fund are complex. Borrowings with a SMSF must be undertaken through a limited recourse borrowing arrangement, which limits the recourse of the lender to a single asset.

With mortgage lenders offering so many different products, getting professional advice is a must. A mortgage broker will support you with recommendations about what’s best for your personal circumstances.

For more information on home loans, talk to WeLend today.

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Fixed, variable, split – find the right fit for you http://welend.com.au/fixed-variable-split-find-the-right-fit-for-you/ http://welend.com.au/fixed-variable-split-find-the-right-fit-for-you/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:09:15 +0000 http://welend.com.au/?p=440 Continue reading "Fixed, variable, split – find the right fit for you"

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In Australia, there are a number of ways to structure your home loan repayments. Finding the best option may save you time and money on your mortgage. Here is some information to help you choose the repayment structure that works best for you.

Variable rate loans

Variable interest rate loans are all about flexibility. Essentially, with a variable rate loan, the interest rate moves up or down as the market moves. This means your loan repayments may also change month-to-month.

If the interest rate drops, then your repayments may drop as well. However, in the event of an interest rate rise, your repayments could also increase.

Many variable rate loans come with additional features, which can reduce the amount of interest paid over the life of the loan. For example, a variable rate loan with a 100% offset arrangement links your loan account to your savings account. Any funds held in your savings account are offset against the borrowed amount, reducing the interest you have to pay.

Many variable rate loans offer flexibility in terms of increased payments, allowing you to pay off your loan faster if you have additional funds available.

Fixed rate loans

A fixed rate loan is one where the interest rate is fixed for a limited period, and immune from any movements in the market. The most popular choices are three and five-year fixed interest loans, although options ranging from one to ten years are available.

Fixed rate loans allow you to make steady, regular repayments. They’re great for borrowers on strict budgets, or if you’re entering into a mortgage at a time when interest rates are likely to rise.

In the event of a drop in interest rates, being locked into a fixed rate may mean your repayments are higher than they otherwise would be. It’s also worth noting that breaking a fixed rate loan can potentially cost thousands of dollars in fees.

Additionally, many banks will charge you a fee for making extra payments towards the loan during the period it has been fixed.

Split rate loans – a foot in each camp

A split rate loan is when you break your mortgage into two loans – one with a fixed rate and one with a variable rate.

It’s something of an ‘each-way bet’. A split loan offers borrowers protection from rate rises (with the fixed portion of the loan) alongside the advantage of rate drops (with the variable portion of the loan).

Most banks will allow you to split your loans from the outset, without having to pay for two separate loan applications.

Choosing the right kind of loan depends on your personal situation, earning capacity and long-term goals for your property. Speaking with WeLend can help you to figure out the best way forward, and could help you save money along the way.

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Confused about home loan pre-approvals? Follow these four steps. http://welend.com.au/confused-about-home-loan-pre-approvals-follow-these-four-steps/ http://welend.com.au/confused-about-home-loan-pre-approvals-follow-these-four-steps/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:59:27 +0000 http://welend.com.au/?p=431 Ready to buy a property? You’ll need to show the seller you have enough money. For most people, this will mean getting a loan, and the first step to getting one is obtaining pre-approval for it.

Pre-approval – also known as conditional approval or approval in principle – is an indication from a lender as to how much you can borrow. If you have pre-approval, vendors and agents know you’re serious about buying. Here are the steps you need to follow.

1.Gather your financial information

To get an idea of how much you can borrow, and therefore what you can afford to buy, you need to give the lender a comprehensive picture of your finances. This includes your income and assets, and your financial obligations such as existing debts and living expenses (including ongoing bills, entertainment, food and car expenses, etc).

You’ll need evidence of everything:

  • Pay slips and tax returns for your income.
  • Title deeds for tangible assets (i.e. physical items such as buildings, machinery and inventory), and portfolio statements for intangible assets (non-physical items such as copyrights and patents).
  • Loan statements for existing loans.
  • Credit card statements showing your credit limit.If you already stick to a budget and have a regular savings history, you may want to provide bank statements to demonstrate this.

You can use all of this information to get an idea of how much you may be able to borrow. There are a number of free mortgage tools and calculators that can help.

2.Meet a lender or broker

Make an appointment to speak to WeLend. We will provide a list of what you need to bring with you, such as the evidence explained above and the required forms of ID.

At the appointment, we will use your information to calculate an approximate borrowing figure. If you want to proceed, you can fill in a pre-approval application form.

3.Undergo a credit check

The lender will arrange for an independent credit bureau to perform a credit check on you. This may affect whether or not you can borrow money, and how much.

4.Receive conditional approval

Assuming your credit rating allows you to borrow, you’ll then receive a conditional approval certificate from the lender. The certificate is usually valid for 90 to 180 days. This is an indication, not a guarantee, of the amount you can borrow.

Use this figure to work out how much you can spend on a property, taking into account the size of your deposit. Factor in expenses such as conveyancing fees, stamp duty and so on. Also consider that you may not be able to borrow as much as the conditional approval certificate indicates.

Securing pre-approval will allow you to househunt with confidence.

What happens next

Once you’ve put in an offer on a house – whether at auction or a private sale – you’ll need to get full approval on a loan. Contact WeLendwith details of the property, and we’ll work through the home loan application process with you.

Obtaining pre-approval for your loan is an important part of the home-buying process. Contact WeLendtoday for help with finding out how much you can borrow.

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